1. Notes: 91189 / 3 weeks ago  from theremina (originally from stuffwhitepeopleask)
  2. Notes: 14041 / 3 weeks ago  from fharperart (originally from odinsblog)
  3. Notes: 23972 / 3 weeks ago  from 3liza (originally from mysharona1987)

    I hope everyone remembers Hillary Clinton’s passionate defense of Israel’s war crimes and total silence on Ferguson when she’s running for president in two years.

    (Source: mysharona1987)

  4. Notes: 878 / 1 month ago  from 3liza (originally from lowbidinal)
    Homeless aboriginal people “evict” City of Vancouver from Oppenheimer Park

    terrorboys:

    littleopticalmachine:

    We, the indigenous people here today in Oppenheimer Park, do hereby assert our Aboriginal Title, as established in law by the Supreme Court of Canada in Tsilhqot’in v British Columbia. Our people have held title to this land since time immemorial, and we are exerting our right to exclusive authority, recognized as an inherent element of our title, over this land and this camp. The City of Vancouver recognizes the unceded and enduring existence of our Aboriginal Title here. Under this recognition, we now require that you leave this place and cease any attempts to remove people or their belongings from this place. Because we are the title holders to this land, we assert that you do not have jurisdiction over this place until such time as our title to it is lawfully resolved. Any actions against this camp are thereby unlawful actions against our title; we demand an immediate cease and desist of action or the threat of action against this camp or those within it.

    A news release from the tenters and their supporters says that about 30 percent of homeless people are aboriginal due to the “effects of colonization and poverty”. It also notes that the 1,798 homeless people counted in Vancouver in March was the “highest number ever counted”.

    Referring to the Downtown Eastside local area plan, the release also claims: “Vision Vancouver approved a plan for the Downtown Eastside that seeks to displace 3,350 residents.”

    On June 25, city council voted to formally acknowledge that the city lies on the unceded traditional territory of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations.

    Fuck yeah

    (Source: lowbidinal)

  5. Notes: 878 / 1 month ago  from 3liza (originally from lowbidinal)
    Homeless aboriginal people “evict” City of Vancouver from Oppenheimer Park

    terrorboys:

    littleopticalmachine:

    We, the indigenous people here today in Oppenheimer Park, do hereby assert our Aboriginal Title, as established in law by the Supreme Court of Canada in Tsilhqot’in v British Columbia. Our people have held title to this land since time immemorial, and we are exerting our right to exclusive authority, recognized as an inherent element of our title, over this land and this camp. The City of Vancouver recognizes the unceded and enduring existence of our Aboriginal Title here. Under this recognition, we now require that you leave this place and cease any attempts to remove people or their belongings from this place. Because we are the title holders to this land, we assert that you do not have jurisdiction over this place until such time as our title to it is lawfully resolved. Any actions against this camp are thereby unlawful actions against our title; we demand an immediate cease and desist of action or the threat of action against this camp or those within it.

    A news release from the tenters and their supporters says that about 30 percent of homeless people are aboriginal due to the “effects of colonization and poverty”. It also notes that the 1,798 homeless people counted in Vancouver in March was the “highest number ever counted”.

    Referring to the Downtown Eastside local area plan, the release also claims: “Vision Vancouver approved a plan for the Downtown Eastside that seeks to displace 3,350 residents.”

    On June 25, city council voted to formally acknowledge that the city lies on the unceded traditional territory of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations.

    Fuck yeah

    (Source: lowbidinal)

  6. Notes: 16453 / 1 month ago  from glukkake (originally from guerrillamamamedicine)
    "

    So anyway, I was having this argument with my father about Martin Luther King and how his message was too conservative compared to Malcolm X’s message. My father got really angry at me. It wasn’t that he disliked Malcolm X, but his point was that Malcolm X hadn’t accomplished anything as Dr. King had.

    I was kind of sarcastic and asked something like, so what did Martin Luther King accomplish other than giving his “I have a dream speech.”

    Before I tell you what my father told me, I want to digress. Because at this point in our amnesiac national existence, my question pretty much reflects the national civic religion view of what Dr. King accomplished. He gave this great speech. Or some people say, “he marched.” I was so angry at Mrs. Clinton during the primaries when she said that Dr. King marched, but it was LBJ who delivered the Civil Rights Act.

    At this point, I would like to remind everyone exactly what Martin Luther King did, and it wasn’t that he “marched” or gave a great speech.

    My father told me with a sort of cold fury, “Dr. King ended the terror of living in the south.”

    Please let this sink in and and take my word and the word of my late father on this. If you are a white person who has always lived in the U.S. and never under a brutal dictatorship, you probably don’t know what my father was talking about.

    But this is what the great Dr. Martin Luther King accomplished. Not that he marched, nor that he gave speeches.

    He ended the terror of living as a black person, especially in the south.

    I’m guessing that most of you, especially those having come fresh from seeing The Help, may not understand what this was all about. But living in the south (and in parts of the midwest and in many ghettos of the north) was living under terrorism.

    It wasn’t that black people had to use a separate drinking fountain or couldn’t sit at lunch counters, or had to sit in the back of the bus.

    You really must disabuse yourself of this idea. Lunch counters and buses were crucial symbolic planes of struggle that the civil rights movement used to dramatize the issue, but the main suffering in the south did not come from our inability to drink from the same fountain, ride in the front of the bus or eat lunch at Woolworth’s.

    It was that white people, mostly white men, occasionally went berserk, and grabbed random black people, usually men, and lynched them. You all know about lynching. But you may forget or not know that white people also randomly beat black people, and the black people could not fight back, for fear of even worse punishment.

    This constant low level dread of atavistic violence is what kept the system running. It made life miserable, stressful and terrifying for black people.

    White people also occasionally tried black people, especially black men, for crimes for which they could not conceivably be guilty. With the willing participation of white women, they often accused black men of “assault,” which could be anything from rape to not taking off one’s hat, to “reckless eyeballing.”

    This is going to sound awful and perhaps a stain on my late father’s memory, but when I was little, before the civil rights movement, my father taught me many, many humiliating practices in order to prevent the random, terroristic, berserk behavior of white people. The one I remember most is that when walking down the street in New York City side by side, hand in hand with my hero-father, if a white woman approached on the same sidewalk, I was to take off my hat and walk behind my father, because he had been taught in the south that black males for some reason were supposed to walk single file in the presence of any white lady.

    This was just one of many humiliating practices we were taught to prevent white people from going berserk.

    I remember a huge family reunion one August with my aunts and uncles and cousins gathered around my grandparents’ vast breakfast table laden with food from the farm, and the state troopers drove up to the house with a car full of rifles and shotguns, and everyone went kind of weirdly blank. They put on the masks that black people used back then to not provoke white berserkness. My strong, valiant, self-educated, articulate uncles, whom I adored, became shuffling, Step-N-Fetchits to avoid provoking the white men. Fortunately the troopers were only looking for an escaped convict. Afterward, the women, my aunts, were furious at the humiliating performance of the men, and said so, something that even a child could understand.

    This is the climate of fear that Dr. King ended.

    If you didn’t get taught such things, let alone experience them, I caution you against invoking the memory of Dr. King as though he belongs exclusively to you and not primarily to African Americans.

    The question is, how did Dr. King do this—and of course, he didn’t do it alone.

    (Of all the other civil rights leaders who helped Dr. King end this reign of terror, I think the most under appreciated is James Farmer, who founded the Congress of Racial Equality and was a leader of nonviolent resistance, and taught the practices of nonviolent resistance.)

    So what did they do?

    They told us: Whatever you are most afraid of doing vis-a-vis white people, go do it. Go ahead down to city hall and try to register to vote, even if they say no, even if they take your name down.

    Go ahead sit at that lunch counter. Sue the local school board. All things that most black people would have said back then, without exaggeration, were stark raving insane and would get you killed.

    If we do it all together, we’ll be okay.

    They made black people experience the worst of the worst, collectively, that white people could dish out, and discover that it wasn’t that bad. They taught black people how to take a beating—from the southern cops, from police dogs, from fire department hoses. They actually coached young people how to crouch, cover their heads with their arms and take the beating. They taught people how to go to jail, which terrified most decent people.

    And you know what? The worst of the worst, wasn’t that bad.

    Once people had been beaten, had dogs sicced on them, had fire hoses sprayed on them, and been thrown in jail, you know what happened?

    These magnificent young black people began singing freedom songs in jail.

    That, my friends, is what ended the terrorism of the south. Confronting your worst fears, living through it, and breaking out in a deep throated freedom song. The jailers knew they had lost when they beat the crap out of these young Negroes and the jailed, beaten young people began to sing joyously, first in one town then in another. This is what the writer, James Baldwin, captured like no other writer of the era.

    Please let this sink in. It wasn’t marches or speeches. It was taking a severe beating, surviving and realizing that our fears were mostly illusory and that we were free.

    "
    -

    Daily Kos :: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did (via guerrillamamamedicine)

    This was just one of many humiliating practices we were taught to prevent white people from going berserk.

    I think this is a really important quote for white people to read. For anyone who is in any group that systematically oppresses another. You think that other group doesn’t have it that bad, but that’s only because you don’t know all the work that is going on behind the scenes - all the things they are doing to keep you thinking everything is OK.

    All the things they are doing to keep you from going berserk.

    And it really really doesn’t matter that not ALL white people (or not ALL men, or not ALL cis people etc.) were going to go berserk. The point is that a significant number probably would, and so black people had to do what they could to protect themselves.

    I cannot imagine the bravery of standing up to that. And please don’t misunderstand me. I made a point that expands this to other oppressed groups. But that is not to say that the oppressions are the same. Each is different. And the way that black people were treated is quite horrifying. And the bravery of standing up to that is something I am ashamed to admit that I am not sure I could manage.

    (via rhube)

  7. Notes: 5231 / 1 month ago  from 3liza (originally from sociolab)
    "In reality, Americans are less likely to move upward from their class of origin than are Germans, Canadians, Finns, French people, Swedes, Norwegians, or Danes. But the myth, fortified with bracing doses of positive thinking, persists. As two researchers at the Brookings Institution observed, a little wryly, in 2006:

    “[The] strong belief in opportunity and upward mobility is the explanation that is often given for Americans’ high tolerance for inequality. The majority of Americans surveyed believe that they will be above mean income in the future (even though that is a mathematical impossibility).”"
    - Barbara Ehrenreich, Bright-Sided:  How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America (via x09)

    (Source: sociolab)

  8. Notes: 259 / 1 month ago  from oldpunkguy (originally from comunistalibertario)
     
  9. Notes: 29086 / 1 month ago  from theremina (originally from yagazieemezi)

    bhagyawati:

    yagazieemezi:

    "For almost 1,000 years, the Rabari have roamed the deserts and plains of what is today western India. It is believed that this tribe, with a peculiar Persian physiognomy, migrated from the Iranian plateau more than a millennium ago. The Rabari are now found largely in Gujarat and Rajasthan.”

    Jimmy Nelson's photography is just beautiful.

  10. Notes: 169780 / 1 month ago  from glukkake (originally from fuckyeahlavernecox)

    johnskylar:

    fuckyeahlavernecox:

    Laverne Cox corrects Gayle King on CBS

    This is why representation matters.  Here she is on TV, explaining concepts like AMAB to a national, even international, audience.  Somebody learned something because Laverne Cox exists.

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